Samsung Galaxy S22 series will use ‘new materials’ made from recycled fishing nets

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Saving the ocean one galaxy at a time

Let’s be honest: businesses need to do a lot more to reuse and recycle their waste and reduce their impact on the environment. Most of the tech giants have set various sustainability goals, including the use of recycled plastic and carbon neutrality to achieve it. Although they have made steady progress in this aspect, it is still not enough. Today, in a major sustainability breakthrough, Samsung announced it has developed a “new material” using discarded ocean fishing nets. The company will use this new material in its future devices, starting with the Galaxy S22 series which is due to launch later this week.

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However, Samsung does not detail how or what plastics it would replace on its devices with this new material. Nevertheless, this decision will mark another step in the company’s decision to eliminate single-use plastics in its products. In 2019, the Korean smartphone maker pledged to switch to more environmentally friendly packaging for its products such as recycled materials and bioplastics.

Citing a report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Samsung points out in its announcement that up to 640,000 tons of fishing nets are left behind each year, destroying marine life and damaging coral reefs and other habitats. The Korean smartphone maker collects and reuses these abandoned fishing nets less than 50 km from shore for use in Galaxy devices, reducing their environmental impact and helping clean up the ocean. It says these will be the “vital first steps to keeping our oceans clean as well as preserving the planet and our collective future.”


Given the scale and size of Samsung and the large number of products it sells, this move should have a positive impact on the environment in the long run. We expect the company to talk more about this new hardware later this week at the Galaxy Unpacked event.

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