Mobile games like Angry Birds, Candy Crush can spy on your kids

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The latest findings from a security website reveal that games like Angry Birds and Candy Crush collect and send users’ personal information to the advertising industry.

STRONG POINTS

  • Popular games like Angry Birds, Candy Crush and more have been found spying on your kids
  • Getting addicted to mobile gaming at a young age is dangerous in many ways.

Popular games like Angry Birds, Candy Crush and others have been found spying on your kids. With easy access to cell phones, most children spend most of their time playing games on cell phones. Getting addicted to mobile gaming at a young age is dangerous in many ways. Games have now been found spying on children. The latest findings from a security website reveal that games collect and send users’ personal information to the advertising industry.

According to a report by Pixelate, most gaming apps on Android and iOS share data with the advertising industry. Games like Angry Birds 2 spy on kids when apps are used. A similar thing has also been noticed with the Candy Crush Saga app. Apps for coloring and doing math homework have also been discovered spying on children. The apps collect the general locations of children and send them to companies that are looking for users with the same interests. The apps even sell the collected information to others,

Pixalate, in its survey, ranked each app likely to be of interest to children. The company then tracked more than 391,000 apps aimed at children across Apple and Google Play stores.

“Pixalate uses automated processing derived from a combination of signals (which is sometimes coupled with human intervention) to determine whether an app is likely to be intended for children, including category, subcategory, rating of content and contextual cues (specifically, child-related keywords in the app title or app description) the company blog read.

According to the study conducted by Pixelate, more than 8% of Apple App Store applications and 7% of Google Play Store applications are aimed at children. About 40% of mobile applications aimed at children have potential access to users’ personal information. The report states that personal information is 42% more likely to be shared with advertisers on child-directed apps. More than 12,000 child-directed apps have potential access to personal information and have no privacy policies detected.

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